Introduce the Hubble Space telescope and the requirement to observe from above our atmosphere.
Deep Field and Ultra-Deep field exercises courtesy of HST Education partners in Munich?

Ontdek een exoplaneet !

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FRAN0001.GIFAls je je afvraagt hoe je een nieuwe exoplaneet kunt ontdekken, probeer dit! 

Roger Ferlet (IAP); Olivier Marco, Ester Aranzana Martinez, Sandra Greiss, & Jeehae Chun (University Pierre Marie Curie)

 

Portrait of a Planetary System (ESO)

 

Read more: Ontdek een exoplaneet !

Lifecycle of Stars - plotting your own HR Diagram

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UNKG0001.GIF Explore the star population inside an open cluster!

 

 

Introduction ngc957_big.medium.jpgAn open cluster (sometimes called a Galactic Cluster) is a group of 10s or 100s of stars that were born from the same initial cloud of gas (mainly Hydrogen) and dust. When they are young (a few million or tens of millions of years old), these clusters contain some very large, bright stars (called O or B-type stars). The very youngest clusters (usually less than 10 million years old) often still contain the remains of the gas cloud from which the stars were born – this is seen as nebulosity.

Cluster stars are very useful as they were all formed from the same giant cloud (so they have the same chemistry), and they are all at about the same distance from us (although they are typically hundreds or thousands of light years away!). By observing a group of stars in a cluster, we can assume they are all made of the same stuff, and they are all the same distance away from us – so any differences between them are really caused by their different mass.

In this project you will be shown how to use Faulkes Telescope data to measure the intensity of light from the stars in a cluster (a process known as photometry), through different filters, and plot the colours of the stars on a 'colour-magnitude diagram'. Once a measure of how “red” or “blue” the stars are is made, more informtion about them can be obtained– massive stars are usually very blue (hot), intermediate mass stars (like the Sun) are yellow, and the very lowest mass stars are red (cool).

Read more: Lifecycle of Stars - plotting your own HR Diagram

Power of tens

Have you ever looked at some large numbers and observed how many zeros there are? For scientists investigating our place in Space and the wider universe the numbers can become extremely large. Scientists can deal with these large numbers by abbreviating them. This concept is known as powers of ten.



Read more: Power of tens

Seven steps for a dwarf star : from Doppler to exoplanets

minervp.gifSeven steps for a dwarf star
From Doppler to exoplanets
FRAN0001.GIF Exercice proposed by :
Roger FERLET, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France
                           Michel FAYE, lycée Louis Le Grand , Paris , France
                           Suzanne FAYE, Lycée Chaptal , Paris , France


Tańczące widmo

  Summary :

  1. SPECTROSCOPY
  2. ANIMATED MOTION OF SPECTRUM LINES
  3. MEASURE WAVELENGTH λ AND FLUX, OPTICAL SPECTRUM
  4. CALCULATING  RADIAL VELOCITY OF THE STAR WITH DOPPLER SHIFT
  5. RADIAL VELOCITY OF THE STAR , AS A FUNCTION OF DATE
  6. DETERMINING THE MASS OF THE COMPANION IN BINARY SYSTEM
  7. DISCOVERING AN EXOPLANET WITH DOPPLER SHIFT OF A STAR

Download the exercise : pdf pdf 317.75 Kb

Download the data (zip file): exoplanet_doppler 541.04 Kb